Weighing The Options

Taking challenging classes are beneficial in ways outside of our academic honor

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Weighing The Options

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The foreboding question of “What’s your plan for the future?” seems to be never ending. The future is right around the corner when we will be thrown into the real world and forced to act like adults. To prepare for this, we are expected to perfect our schedules and find the right balance of weighted and unweighted, STEM and arts. When it comes down to it, taking difficult classes and challenging oneself can strengthen one’s mind and character.

Not only do harder classes look stronger on applications, they can teach students life skills.

“I take hard classes because they prepare me for the future, not only in college, but also in my career,” senior Lauren Baetje said. “The challenging material is very helpful to know, but I think the most important thing to gain from taking hard classes are the management skills. I can’t procrastinate, and I have to learn how to take good notes, study, ask questions, and manage my time well. Those are all skills that will help me in college and beyond.”

Through challenging oneself in advanced courses, one can grow a deeper knowledge and appreciation of the world around them, while sharpening their character. Hard classes help shape students to be well-rounded people, growing more than just their mind.

“From being challenged in [harder] classes, I’ve learned how to handle my stress better and how to focus my time for homework or studying,” sophomore Ben Miles said. “I run cross-country and practice can run pretty late, so you quickly learn how to give yourself enough time for each task.”

Not only do harder courses strengthen all corners of a student’s mind, they also can boost one’s grade point average. High GPAs are appealing to colleges, and they have the ability to set students apart from competitors.

“Generally speaking, taking challenging courses is beneficial to students,” St. Louis Regional Admissions Representative for the University of Missouri Tim Eggleston said. “It is good practice for future school, work, and life to challenge oneself intellectually, as you’ll be asked to do this over and over again throughout your academic and professional career.”

Pushing oneself to strive for greatness through taking more challenging classes will both strengthen their mind and soul while giving them an advantage when it comes to their future as a college applicant.